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Section 14
Track #14: 6 Steps to Success


Table of Contents | NCCAP/NCTRC CE Booklet

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Note-Taking Exercise

Step 1: _______________

Sample Staff Support and Cooperation Log:
What is a staff support situation that occurred today and who was involved?

 

What was your attitude and that of the other staff members involved? 

 

 

What was your behavior and that of the other staff members?

 

What do you feel were some obstacles involved? 

 

Has there been any progress with this person?  Or how would you define the problem? 

 

Step 2: _______________
Staff you feel may be dismissing you:
1.
2.
3.

Small goals to maximize your chance of success with this staff member:
1.
2.
3.

Step 3: _______________
Describe how you handled a particular incident in which you feel you did not receive support:

 

Step 4: _______________
How did you react in the incident you described above?  What emotions did you feel?

 

How did the other staff member react?

 

Step 5: _______________
Who will you observe? 

What can you learn that fits your style of relating to people?

Step 6: _______________
What are some alternate responses to the situation you described above?

 

Notes:

 

Transcript of Track 14

On this track, we will examine the six steps in which to track your progress regarding gaining staff support and cooperation.  The six steps are observation, setting goals, Concentrating on a Specific Situation, Reviewing Responses, Observe an Effective Model, and Alternative Responses.

Pause the CD player throughout this track when you hear the musical tone to apply the idea to the situation in your facility.  This would be a good track to play on your way home from work to debrief yourself and check your progress.

#1  Step 1:  Observation
Step 1 in this process is observation and tracking.  Over the course of a couple of weeks, pay close attention to your behavior.  As you go through your day, mentally note the times that you have gone without dealing with a situation when you should have and note the times when you deal with situations tactfully and appropriately.  The second part of step 1, tracking, is physically writing down the events of the week.  Consider keeping a Staff Support and Cooperation Log.   The log can have five parts.  After I read each part of the five parts, pause your CD player and think how this applies to you.

What is a staff support Situation that occurred today and who was involved? (MUSIC)
What was your attitude and that of the other staff member involved?  (MUSIC)
What was my behavior and that of the other staff members? (MUSIC)
What do you feel were some obstacles involved?  (MUSIC)
Has there been any progress with this person?  Or how would I define the problem?  (MUSIC)

To make this exercise effective, you may want to play this track daily, as mentioned previously. 

#2 Step 2:  Setting Goals
After your analysis of what happened, Step 2 is goal setting.  Once you've reviewed what happened, you may start to notice weaknesses in your approach.  For instance, you might state "I had trouble gaining support and cooperation with the director of nursing, but I was easily able to do so with those in my department."  When you hear the musical tone make a list of the staff who you feel may be dismissing you.  Your goal could be to tactfully deal with a problem regarding their behavior with at least one staff member on your list next week, should the situation arise again.  It would be wise to set small goals to maximize your chance of success.  (MUSIC)

#3 Step 3:  Concentrating on a Specific Situation
After your analysis of what happened, goal setting;  Step 3 involves concentrating on a specific situation in which you feel you did not receive support.  Close your eyes and spend a couple of minutes picturing how you handled a particular incident.  Did another employee seemingly make a negative statement to you?  Did one of your staff members neglect to do a task you asked them to do?  Imagine vividly the actual details.  How did you feel during the incident?  How did you feel after the incident?  (MUSIC)

#4 Step 4:  Reviewing Responses
The next step, step 4, is called reviewing your responses.  In this stage, you'll want to get out your log and write down the specifics of the situations.  List what you said, what the other staff member said, how you reacted and how they reacted.  Note and write down your emotions.  If a major element of your response involves anxiety, you may want to refer to track 2 in which we discussed conflict phobias.  Do not attempt to force yourself into very painful situations.  On the other hand, do not avoid new growth if it is only moderately uncomfortable. 

#5 Step 5:  Observe an Effective Model
Step five helps you to choose an appropriate method for gaining staff support and cooperation by observing an effective model.  Choose someone in your facility that you know to be tactful and handles the same situation very well.  How does this person act?  What do you feel it is about them that results in the support and cooperation they receive.  For example I observed the head of housekeeping that had a team of dedicated care staff that smiled as they did tasks most would consider drudgery.  Who is that staff member in your facility.  What do they do?  Observe him or her.  What can you learn that fits your style of relating to people? (MUSIC)

#6 Step 6:  Alternative Responses
The sixth and final step involves considering alternative responses to the situation.  What are other possible ways the incident could be handled?  Could you deal with it more directly?  More firmly?  Less offensive?   Less firmly?  Now, imagine yourself handling the situation.  Close your eyes and visualize yourself dealing effectively with your practice situation.  You could act similarly to the model you selected in step five or you could try something completely different.  It is all up to your comfort zone.  Keep as much of your natural self as possible.  Remember, you're not trying to overhaul yourself, just improve your tactfulness to gain staff support.  Develop ways to hurtle obstacles in your visualizations.  If negative thoughts jump into your mind, replace them with positive affirmations.  Make a list of these positive assertions to say to yourself.  You might say "They gave me this job because they knew I was competent.  I should know that too."  Practice saying these statements to yourself several times.  (MUSIC)

On this track, we discussed the six steps in which to track your progress in gaining staff support and cooperation. 

What is the Gem of an idea that you got from this track?   This track is so content dense I am sure you will want to replay it daily to actually implement some of the specific techniques suggested.  Remember just listening won't change any thing related to your goal of gaining cooperation from staff. .  So when will you replay this track and the others? 

 

On this two CD set, we have discussed: Administrator support; developing clout with nursing; conquering your conflict avoidance; priorities & strategies for your wish list; how to get ‘em to follow through; five ways to gain respect; getting PT, OT, and Speech schedule coordination; Grumbling, complaining, and over-apologizing; proven steps to getting cooperation; knowing risks; obstacles to gaining staff support; overcoming uncertainty  committing to change; and tracking your progress.

Hopefully, by now you see that teamwork is not impossible at all.  It just requires work!

A good companion for this course on team building is another course in our Activity Management series, entitled "Step-by-Step Proven Techniques to Get Department Head & Staff Support!"  If you haven't purchased this course, you might consider doing so.  Good luck building a team atmosphere in your facility one relationship at a time.


NCCAP/NCTRC CE Booklet
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