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Section 26
Inservice Training Sheets

Table of Contents | NCCAP/NCTRC CE Booklet

In order to gain staff support, you may need to deal with anger, fear, and anxiety issues you may not have noticed were present. By going into your fears and anxieties and listening to them, you can gradually release their hold on you, turning them around so they can be energy sources.  Your feared feelings can be energy drainers if you focus on conflicts, de­fenses, confusions, anxieties, angers, and frustrations; instead of viewing them as all part of being you and of being alive.

Your feelings can also be used as barometers
1. to tell you when you’re becoming aroused,
2. to warn you of dangers from others,
3. to give you hunches or cues when you need to listen and not talk.

The table below lists some words to describe feelings: part one is for when your requests for support are successful, and part two is for when your requests for support are not successful during your script delivery.

                                                                                                                                   
1. When Your Requests for Staff Support Are Being Satisfied

Absorbed
Affection
Alive
Amused
Appreciation
Astonished
Breathless
Calm
Cheerful
Complacent
Concerned
Confident
Curious
Delighted

Eager
Elated
Encouraged
Engrossed
Enthusiastic
Excited
Exhilarated
Expansive
Fascinated
Friendly
Fulfilled
Gleeful
Glowing
Good-humored

Grateful
Helpful
Inquisitive
Inspired
Intense
Interested
Invigorated
Jubilant
Keyed-up
Mellow
Merry
Moved
Optimistic
Overwhelmed

Peaceful
Proud
Radiant
Refreshed
Relieved
Secure
Spellbound
Stimulated
Surprised
Thrilled
Tranquil
Trust
Wide-awake
Zestful

2. When Requests for Staff Support Are Not Satisfied

Afraid
Agitation
Aloof
Angry
Animosity
Annoyance
Anxious
Apprehensive
Aversion
Beat
Blah
Bored
Chagrined
Cold
Confused
Cross
Dejected
Despondent
Detached

Discouraged
Disgusted
Disheartened
Dismayed
Disquieted
Disturbed
Downcast
Dread
Edgy
Embarrassed
Exasperated
Fatigued
Fidgety
Frightened
Furious
Gloomy
Guilty
Hate
Helpless

Nettled
Passive
Perplexed
Provoked
Rancorous
Reluctant
Resentful
Restless
Scared
Shaky
Skeptical
Sleepy
Sour
Spiritless
Startled
Suspicion
Thwarted
Troubled
Uneasy

 

Type of Response

Staff Member

Support Requested

List feelings experienced

Unsupportive

 

 

 

Supportive

 

 

 

By labeling your feelings, you become more consciously aware of what your request for support has produced inside of you.  We have an entire course specifically targeting stress reduction for Activity Professionals.  This course is entitled “Activity Director!  Simple Effective Stress Reduction Tools.”


NCCAP/NCTRC CE Booklet
Forward to Section 27
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