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CE Book

Answer questions below. Then click the "Check Your Score" button below. This CE Book screen gives you FREE scoring and anonymous unlimited FREE trials, once you purchase the course. If you get a score of 80% or higher, and place a credit card order online, you can get an Instant Certificate for 10 CE's.


DVD Questions The answer to Question 1 is found in DVD Track 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 2 is found in DVD Track 2 of the Course Content... and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! Numbers below will link to that Section once you purchase the course. If you leave this page, use your "Back" button to return to your answers, rather than clicking on a new "CE Book" link. Or use Ctrl-N to open a new window. (Because many computers will not accept "Cookie-Type Programs," when you close this page, your answers will not be retained. So if working in more than one session, write your answers down.)

Questions:

1. To have a structured bedridden one-to-one program, what three questions must be answered?
2. What is the difference between a “Socially-Independent” resident and a “Group” resident?
3. When you complete your “Finding Time” ratio of total number of residents to total number of “Loners,” how should you define “Loners?”
4. If 1/2 of your resident population is Loners, or 1/3 of your resident population is Loners, how much of your programming time should be spent with them?
5. If an Activity Director sees every resident in the facility every day, what is the problem?
6. Why do you need to schedule a whole half day for your Success Therapy® one-to-one activities?
7. According to the speaker, what is one justifiable and one unjustifiable repetition of the same program within the week?
8. What is one reason why it is necessary to have a separate program for alert residents and a separate program for confused residents?
9. In light of the fact that there is a growing number of impaired residents due to medical advances and surgical procedures that cause residents to live longer but not healthier lives, according to the speaker, an Activity Director needs to fulfill what three roles?
10. What are pet pretty patients and job jollies?
11. According to the speaker, the Activities Program is both limited and enhanced by what factors?
12. What is one reason why it is important to be sure to note one-to-one activities as more than just a “Visit” with the resident?
13. When choosing which residents to begin one-to-one activities with, what did the speaker mean by “Don’t set yourself up to fail?”
14. What is a good number of residents to start Success Therapy® with?

Answers:

A. Alert residents do not want to interact with the confused residents because they feel threatened by them.
B. The speaker pointed out that if all of the patients in one group of one-to-one sessions are difficult, then the Activity Director will burn out quickly.  Vary the ability level of the residents.
C. Though a Socially-Independent resident can socialize with other residents or roommates, he or she does not attend group activities.
D. ½ or 1/3 of your programming time should be spent with Loners if they comprise ½ or 1/3 respectively of your resident population.
E. Pet pretty patients are the handful of alert residents that attend most group activities, and since they are vocal, the Activity Director tends to create a program to meet the needs of this handful.  Job jollies are Activity Directors that create a program that meets their needs and not the needs of the low-functioning Alzheimer’s resident.
F. Start with 3 residents and get input from nursing rather than picking 7 or 10 and going gung ho and getting nursing upset.
G. The bingo chip-tapping, domineering resident makes you accountable for your time. But the total care bedridden confused resident cannot and will not make demands upon your time. If you try to sandwich in time for your lower- functioning residents, it ends up being sandwiched out.
H. Success Therapy® activities are structured activities: there is a problem, a goal, and an approach.  Credit should be given for the work that goes into one-to-one activities.
I. Who are your bedridden residents?; When do you see them?; and What do you do with them?
J. The Activity Director’s (or the Activity Department’s) interests and abilities; the residents’ interests and abilities
K. 1. Residents who cannot come out of their room; 2. Residents who will not come out of their room; 3. Residents whose needs are not met by the group activity program
L. This Activity Director may speed through the residents’ rooms once a day, but no quality structured time is actually being spent with the residents on a one-to-one basis.  Who did she see? She saw the residents that happened to be available.
M.. In today’s nursing home the Activity Director needs to be a delegator, a program developer, a department manager, and not a first hand cog in the wheel; where he or she get s a program started then recruits a volunteers to come in and take over that program that the AD developed.
N. A justifiable repeat of a program occurs when, for example, you have two Bingo games in a week: one regular Bingo game for the high functioning and a Picture Bingo game for the lower functioning. However, a repeat is not justifiable if the same group attends both Bingo games.  The reason given is “They (the alert residents) wanted it that way.” In the speaker’s opinion, the less-aware resident is more important because she gets no stimulation unless someone comes to her, whereas alert residents can meet their own social needs.

"Instructor's Guide" Manual Questions The answer to Question 15 is found in Section 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 16 is found in Section 2 of the Course Content... and so on. Select correct answer from below. The Section numbers below correspond with the Section number in the Manual in which the answer is found. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! If you leave this page, use your "Back" button to return to your answers, rather than clicking on a new "CE Book" link. Or use Ctrl-N to open a new window. (Because many computers will not accept "Cookie-Type Programs," when you close this page, your answers will not be retained. So if working in more than one session, write your answers down.)

Questions

15. Section #1: What is the secret to having a workable physical environment?
16. Section #2: What are two hints to make de-cluttering less stressful? 
17. Section #3: What are six tips for “operating” your To-Do List?
18. Section #4: In addition to tasks, what are five other types of information you might keep track of on your To-Do List?
19. Section #5: What are the three ways to organize your Daily Task List to make more time?
20. Section #6: What are two keys to avoid the “low-priority trap”? 
21. Section #7:  What is "taking advantage of your biological rhythms"?
22. Section #8:  What are the four suggestions for the fine art of handling drop-in visitors and spontaneous meetings? 
23. Section #9:  What is a good tool to use if you have a tendency to chatter? 
24. Section #10: What are four concepts to consider when finding you optimum Activities workstyle?
25. Section #11:  How might you adapt the Contact Folders idea to streamline meetings?
26. Section #12:  If you suspect you are in the grip of perfectionism, what question should you ask yourself?

Answers

A. Miscellaneous ideas for “future action”, errands arranged geographically, ideas from a conference or magazine, questions for an Administrator/Consultant Meeting, Success Therapy® ideas.
B. 1. Do you prefer working from hard to easy, or vice versa?  2. Do you prefer a variety of tasks, or one project at a time? 3.What are your tolerance levels? 4. Do you work best under pressure, or in a calm environment?
C. You should ask yourself, “Is the amount of time and effort I’m putting into this task warranted by the potential payoff?”
D. The secret lies in the art of placement: Put the things you use most often where you can lay hands on them most easily
E. 1) Don’t fail to knock off low-priority tasks, or they can create a paralyzing thicket of loose ends. 2) To keep your priorities in focus.
F. Organizing certain tasks to coincide with your energy bursts and lapses.
G. You can create 'instant agendas' for meetings by creating a Contact Folder for the meeting, and dropping materials to be discussed into the folder as things come up.
H. Call a clutter buddy and record your progress
I. Free-form, by content, and functionally.
J. A three-minute egg timer
K. Record things that need to be done as they come up, break big tasks down, transfer to a calendar, delegate, ASAP, reserve a page for ongoing projects.
L. 1) Meet in other people’s offices. 2) Set a time contract 3) Confer standing up. 4) Keep your briefcase on the visitor’s chair.