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CE Book

Answer questions below. Then click the "Check Your Score" button below. This CE Book screen gives you FREE scoring and anonymous unlimited FREE trials. If you get a score of 80% or higher, and place a credit card order online, you can get an Instant Certificate for 10 CE's.


DVD Questions The answer to Question 1 is found in DVD Track 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 2 is found in DVD Track 2 of the Course Content... and so on. Select correct answer from below. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! If you leave this page, use your "Back" button to return to your answers, rather than clicking on a new "CE Book" link. Or use Ctrl-N to open a new window. (Because many computers will not accept "Cookie-Type Programs," when you close this page, your answers will not be retained. So if working in more than one session, write your answers down.)

Questions:

1. In the anecdote about Earl, how did the speaker stop Earl’s manipulation of Activities?
2. According to the speaker, how are domineering residents damaging to Activities programs?
3. What is the first step in dealing with a domineering resident?
4. When planning an independent activity for a domineering resident, what did the speaker say are the three requirements for the activity?
5. What is the ideal situation in regard to resident needs?
6. What can be two motivating criteria for a successful activity for a resident?
7. What is the reason why it is important to incorporate the demonstration of a new independent activity into an already scheduled activity?
8. What are two crucial actions to take with an attention-seeking resident?
9. When working with Martha, a Stage-3 Alzheimer’s resident, why did the speaker have to take the Approach of not speaking to the resident during the Block-Stacking Activity?
10. When confronted in a conflict about an Activities issue, what are the two steps in the process to resolve the conflict?
11. What is the problem regarding changing the Activities program without talking to the administrator and other staff members first?
12. How can problems with nursing, like transporting residents and getting cooperation, be solved?
13. What were two examples of staff misuse of Activities materials that may indicate the need for an inservice training program?
14. What is the main reason why communication with other staff members is so important for Activities?
15. What are four steps based on Rational Emotive Therapy you might use when dealing with your domineering residents?

Answers:

A. 1. Give the resident attention when he or she is not actively seeking attention, and 2. when he or she does what you want, be sure to give a lot of praise
B.
1. Brown paper bag taped to the nightstand used as a trash bag 2. Materials, like an inner tube, thrown away.
C.  Even though they are your friends, they are vocal and may be damaging to your Activities program because they are very controlling or manipulative. Activities needs to see these residents in a different light if they have not been identified as “domineering.”
D. The independent activity must be not dangerous, inexpensive, and not messy
E. 1. Find some legitimate, sincere point of agreement between you and the other person. 2. Ask the other person for an idea to help solve the problem
F.
One-to-one activities are invisible to most people outside of the Activities Department, and other staff members need to be aware of
those activities, when they do  not see a large group in the lounge or Activities room
G. The activity needs to be at the resident’s interest level and ability level.
H. Nursing can be resentful of the fact that Activities can pick and choose who they work with, while Nursing has to attend to every
resident. If Activities works to spend time with all of the residents, Nursing may be more responsive.
I. The speaker confronted Earl about his motivation for always asking about Bingo, and after Earl admitted he just wanted more Bingo games, he stopped persistently asking for Bingo.
J. Any change in the program can affect other staff. These staff members may complain to the administrator about any unexpected problems they are having resulting from the program change, of which they were uninformed  
K. After deciding to change an activity, explain point-blank what the program change is going to be and the reason.
L. When residents can meet other residents’ needs is the ideal situation
M. The speaker found that if she directed the activity verbally that Martha would repeat words and talk to herself, distracting herself from the original task.
N. The domineering resident should not be allowed to spend an extra time segment with Activities since the goal is to reduce the time spent with that one resident
O. 1. Recognize the resident’s feelings; 2. Make a factual statement in a factual tone; 3. Draw a conclusion; 4. The next time the resident asks, make a neutral one-line statement in a neutral tone.

"Instructor's Guide" Manual Questions The answer to Question 16 is found in Section 1 of the Course Content. The Answer to Question 17 is found in Section 2 of the Course Content... and so on. Select correct answer from below. The Section numbers below correspond with the Section number in the Manual in which the answer is found. Place letter on the blank line before the corresponding question.
Important Note! If you leave this page, use your "Back" button to return to your answers, rather than clicking on a new "CE Book" link. Or use Ctrl-N to open a new window. (Because many computers will not accept "Cookie-Type Programs," when you close this page, your answers will not be retained. So if working in more than one session, write your answers down.)

Questions

16. Section #1: What is involved in the rationalizing form of denial?
17. Section #2: What does the view of human transactions in simple cause-and-effect terms lead someone to think?
18. Section #3: What are the two components of the view that your thoughts, rather than the actual events themselves, create your moods?
19. Section #4: What are the two parts to a rephrasing statement when attempting to de-escalate a conflict with a domineering resident?
20. Section #5: What are three parts to an assertive statement?
21. Section #6: What does each of three A’s refer to in the Triple A Approach?
22. Section #7:  What technique might you try to disrupt your train of self-defeating thinking?
23. Section #8:  Which word should you definitely avoid during centering?
24. Section #9:  What are the seven steps to centering?
25. Section #10:  What is the tyranny of the shoulds?
26. Section #11:  Why is it a good idea to try to avoid using the words, “I’m sorry,” when saying “no” to a domineering resident?
27. Section #12:  According to Richardson, what three ideas are needed to prepare for a courageous act?

Answers

A.  The two parts to a rephrasing statement are 1. what you think the resident feels, and 2. what you think the issue is.
B. It is the absolute nature of belief, the unbending sense of right and wrong. If you don’t live up to your shoulds, you judge yourself to be a bad and unworthy person.
C. Support, a history of success, and a courage talisman.
D. Offering reasons or justifications for the behavior of the domineering resident.
E. Awareness, Analysis, Action.
F. You might try the “thought stopping” technique.
G. Apologizing is often unnecessary and dishonest, and it also tends to compromise your basic right to say no.
H. If they are angry, someone else caused it, or, if they are the target of someone else’s anger, they must be to blame
I. 1. “I think” 2.  “I feel” 3.  “I want”
J. Form your clear intention, Pick a focal point, Breathe mindfully, Release tension, Find your center, Repeat your process cue, Direct your energy.
K. 1) arousal (physical sensations—gut churning, butterflies, dizziness, profuse sweating, etc.), and 2) a label
so the mind knows what to call it.
L. During centering, you should not use the word ‘don’t’.